The Top Teeth-Staining Foods and Beverages

If you don’t want to be “that” person in a Holiday picture or family photo that has yellowish stained teeth read below to find out the most common staining foods and beverages and then tips to minimize staining.

1. Wine. Red and white wine are notorious for staining teeth.
2. Tea. Like wine, the ordinary black tea most people drink is rich in stain-promoting tannins. It’s a bigger stainer than coffee, which is chromogen-rich but low in tannins. Herbal, green, and white teas are less likely to stain than black tea.
3. Cola. Acidic and chromogen-rich, cola can cause significant staining. But even light-colored soft drinks are sufficiently acidic to promote staining of teeth by other foods and beverages.
4. Sports drinks. Highly acidic sports drinks can soften tooth enamel setting the stage for staining.
5. Berries. Blueberries, blackberries, cranberries, cherries, grapes, pomegranates, and other intensely colored fruits.
6. Sauces. Soy sauce, tomato sauce, curry sauce, and other deeply colored sauces.
7. Sweets. Hard candies, chewing gum, popsicles, and other sweets often contain teeth-staining coloring agents. If your tongue turns a funny color there’s a good chance that your teeth will be affected, too.

Tips to Minimize Stained Teeth

• Use a straw. Sipping beverages through a straw is believed to help keep teeth-staining beverages away from the teeth — the front teeth, in particular. No, you’re probably not eager to use a straw for coffee or wine. But it shouldn’t be too much trouble to use a straw for cola, juices, and iced tea.
• Swish with water. It’s not always convenient to brush your teeth after having something to eat or drink. Even when it is, it might be better not to: dental enamel is highly vulnerable to abrasion from tooth brushing for up to 30 minutes after the consumption of an acidic food or beverage. So it’s safer simply to swish with water — and brush later, once the enamel has had a chance to re-harden. Another way to remove stain-causing substances without brushing is to chew sugarless gum after eating or drinking.

This article was written by Valley Dental

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